Health Topics Information

Health Topics

Back to School with Balance

Back to School with Balance

Regardless of how early families start preparing for the start of a new school year, there never seems to be enough time to stop back to school stress from affecting kids of all ages and their parents. Articles typically abound this time of year with stress-busting tips and strategies. As a psychologist, I’ve written more than a dozen of these articles, and although I do believe traditional stress reducing strategies (e.g., breathing, relaxation, and pacing) are helpful, we all know that the stress facing our kids and parents this year is different. I doubt you need a psychologist to tell you that there’s no magical stress-busting strategy that can make starting school in the midst of a global pandemic easy. Instead, allow this psychologist to offer a different strategy: Stop wasting time trying to kick stress to the curb.

Outdoor Buzz: Take the Sting Out of Insect Bites

Outdoor Buzz: Take the Sting Out of Insect Bites

Whether you’re in the backyard or the back country, you may encounter nature’s smallest locals: bees, mosquitoes, ticks and chiggers. While usually just an annoyance, some bites and stings can hurt, itch, spread disease, or even be deadly. The first step to protecting yourself is taking preventive measures to keep these pesky creatures at bay.

Play It Safe with Mother Nature

Play It Safe with Mother Nature

First Aid Tips for Common Outdoor Injuries
Families are flocking to the great outdoors because it’s a COVID-19 safe way to play. But it’s not without minor dangers like insect stings, burns and more. Here’s a quick guide to dealing with most common summer and fall injuries.

Heat Stroke is No Joke: Know the Symptoms

Heat Stroke is No Joke: Know the Symptoms

Summer is time for fun in the sun, but hot days can turn dangerous quickly. Heat-related conditions send thousands of people to emergency departments each summer, and needless tragedies occur when children and pets are left inside hot vehicles. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke happen when you’re exposed to excessive heat and the body absorbs more heat than it can release.

While heat exhaustion is serious, heat stroke is a dangerous, potentially deadly condition that occurs when the body’s core temperature rises to 104 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.

12 Ways to Manage Pain without Opioids

Sweet Relief: 12 Ways to Manage Pain without Opioids

Pain is big problem for millions of Americans. In fact, lower back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. If the hurt isn’t completely disabling, it can still result in lost income and interfere with daily life.

Naturally, we all want to make pain go away. But reaching for a prescription opioid isn’t the best answer – or sometimes even an option. The current medical recommendations are to not use opioids at all for people with chronic pain and instead try alternative methods of pain control.

Men’s Health

Men’s Health

The leading cause of death for men is not a specific disease but an attitude of independence and maybe a little stubbornness. Okay a whole lot of stubbornness! The same attitude that prevents us from using a map prevents us from establishing a solid practice of ongoing health monitoring. What is somewhat disturbing is that for the most part the leading causes of early death for men are usually preventable and treatable once found. Let’s look at the leading causes of death for men.

Sun Safety

Sun Safety

Ultraviolet (UV) rays - from the sun and other sources like tanning beds – are the number one cause of skin cancer. Too much exposure can also cause sunburn, eye damage, and premature wrinkles. But shielding your skin with clothing, broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30, and staying in the shade can help lower your risk.

Take these steps to stay sun-safe:

Healthy Relationships Healthy You

Healthy Relationships = Healthy You

Relationships impact health. According to Harvard Health Publishing social connections influence long-term health; studies have shown that people who have satisfying relationships with family, friends and their community are happier, have fewer health problems, and live longer. Inversely, a lack of healthy relationships is associated with depression, later-life cognitive decline, and increased mortality.