Health Topics Information

Health Topics

Bundle Up and Beware of Frostbite This Winter

Bundle Up and Beware of Frostbite This Winter

This year’s Farmers’ Almanac calls for “teeth-chattering cold” across much of the nation. If you find yourself in the deep freeze, remember this: frostbite doesn’t appear frosty. The damage from this dangerous condition occurs under the skin - not at the surface. Symptoms vary and people sometimes don’t realize frostbite is occurring because their skin doesn’t feel cold. Be alert to these signs:

  • Redness, stinging, burning, throbbing or prickling sensation
  • White, bluish-white or grayish-yellow skin
  • Unusually firm or waxy skin
  • Numbness

The nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers and toes are most often affected, and damage occurs in stages.

This Relationship Can Make You Healthier: You and Your Family Medicine Provider

This Relationship Can Make You Healthier: You and Your Family Medicine Provider

If you have a family medicine provider you see on a regular basis, you may be setting yourself up for better care, a healthier life and you might even save some money.

A 2017 poll, by the American Academy of Family Physicians, found that an overwhelming majority of Americans (89 percent) felt it was important to have a relationship with a physician who knows their health background and family history. A majority (86 percent) said they felt that primary care leads to healthier patients, higher quality care and lower costs.

New Cystic Fibrosis Therapy

New Cystic Fibrosis Therapy

An old adage says: Woe to that child which when kissed on the forehead tastes salty. He is bewitched and soon must die. This is an early reference to babies born with cystic fibrosis.

Recently, more than 5000 individuals joined together at the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, with one goal: To care for individuals with cystic fibrosis and to one day find a cure. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundations mission is to do just that, find a cure for cystic fibrosis.

5 Reasons to Give the Flu Vaccine a Chance

5 Reasons to Give the Flu Vaccine a Chance

The last flu season was the longest in a decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Up to 26.3 million people got sick and as many as 31,200 died as two waves of influenza swept through the country from October through March.

The effectiveness of the influenza vaccine varies each year, but it absolutely provides the best protection against becoming sick - or even dying - from flu. During the 2016-2017 flu season, the flu vaccine prevented an estimated 5.3 million flu cases, 2.6 million flu-related medical visits and 85,000 hospitalizations.

Finding Hope for the Holiday Blues

Finding Hope for the Holiday Blues

t’s the most wonderful time of the year. Or is it? For some, holiday celebrations can increase feelings of anxiety, depression or loneliness. When you are grieving or struggling with negative emotions, the season can be very difficult. It’s full of demands on your time and energy with shopping, baking, wrapping, houseguests and parties. Winter weather with less sunlight and North Dakota weather can dampen moods. We also tend to eat and drink more, which can contribute to less-than-festive feelings.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) is celebrated throughout October and it’s an excellent opportunity to talk to victims of domestic violence about the help and services available to them, educate the public, and inspire action to end all forms of domestic violence. Domestic violence is a healthcare issue that can result in a variety of co-morbid health conditions. Those who talked to a healthcare professional about intimate partner violence were four times more likely to use an intervention. Healthcare professionals are in a unique position to help victims of domestic violence and that starts with speaking out about domestic violence, but that’s not always an easy task. Try some of these tips for having and informed conversation about domestic violence (DV).

Breast Cancer Detection Improved with 3D Mammography

Breast Cancer Detection Improved with 3D Mammography

Breast cancer is still the most common cancer for U.S. women. About one in eight women develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. Most breast cancers, approximately 85 percent occur in women who have no family history. Many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. 3D mammography, also called Digital Breast Tomosythesis, generates multiple image slices of the breast. The radiologist can then examine the images, one slice at a time. Fine details and small tumors are more clearly visible because they are no longer hidden by overlapping tissue, which is common with traditional mammography.

September is Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month

September is Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month

Pulmonary fibrosis means scarring of the tissue of the lung. The fibrosis will continue to progress and eventually destroy the normal lung tissue making it difficult for the body to absorb oxygen into the blood. This will make the levels of oxygen low in body and cause shortness of breath and damage to other organs. More than 200 different types of pulmonary fibrosis affect one out of 200 adults over the age of 60 in the U.S., and approximately 40,000 American’s die from it each year.