Health Topics Information

Health Topics

Cold Weather and Exercise

Cold Weather and Exercise

Frigid temperatures can discourage even the most motivated exercisers. It may be easy to pack away your workout gear for the winter, but you don't have to let cold weather be the end of your fitness routine. Consider exercise is every bit as important as eating, sleeping and breathing... It should not be viewed as an ancillary part of your day, but rather a necessity.

Exercise is safe for almost everyone, even in cold weather. But if you have certain conditions, such as asthma, heart problems or Raynaud's disease, check with your doctor first to review any special precautions you need based on your condition or your medications.

Making YOU a Better YOU

Making YOU a Better YOU

The New Year can be an exciting time and provides an opportunity to recommit to your health and well-being. As we look ahead to 2019 and establish our New Year’s resolutions, now is the time for us to think about our personal health goals and commit to a healthier lifestyle not only this year but for years to come.

A fall may result in a visit to emergency room

A fall may result in a visit to emergency room

With winter in full swing, the rate of visits to urgent care and the emergency department due to falls is on the rise. Falls tend to increase during the winter months, especially with wet, cold and slippery conditions. Falls also occur more frequently around the holidays when people are more active and may be unfamiliar with their surroundings.

About half of all falls occur at home. The incidence of falls increases after age 50 and gradually rises with age, as does the risk for severe injuries and mortality. Almost half of individuals 65 and older end up going to a nursing home or rehabilitation facility after a fall-related injury. No matter what your age, you can reduce your risk for falls by improving your strength, balance and flexibility, and by taking steps to make you stay safe this winter.

Heartburn or Heart Attack?

Heartburn or Heart Attack?

You’ve felt that burning sensation in your chest after eating certain foods, but what if it’s more than just heartburn you’re experiencing? Heartburn and a heart attack may feel very much alike and it is important to know when to seek help. In fact, severe heartburn accounts for more than half of people seen in the ER in which actual heart problems are ruled out.

Is it Flu or a Cold?

Is it Flu or a Cold?

Influenza is a respiratory infection caused by a contagious virus that comes on rather suddenly with fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, or a headache. A cold is also a contagious virus that attacks the nose and throat, causing inflammation and mucous.

What is Atrial fibrillation and How is it Treated?

What is Atrial fibrillation and How is it Treated?

Atrial fibrillation, or Afib, is the most common heart rhythm condition in the United States. An estimated three million people in the U.S. and 20 million worldwide are affected by Afib and its prevalence is projected to increase significantly as the population ages. Afib causes the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, to beat rapidly and in an uncontrolled manner. This irregular beating of the heart affects blood flow and some patients experience a "fluttering" feeling in the chest. The condition can have a significant negative impact on an individual's quality of life in terms of physical, psychological, emotional, and social functioning.

The Connection between Mind and Body

The Connection between Mind and Body

According to the American Psychological Association, approximately 45 million people had a mental illness within the past year. To break that down further, up to one in four, or 25 percent, of adults suffer from a mental illness at any given time. We all know someone who battle the symptoms of a variety of illnesses, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Mental health symptoms alone can be debilitating and major depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability for younger adults (ages 15-44).

Overloaded Backpacks Awarded Failing Grades

Overloaded Backpacks Awarded Failing Grades

While a backpack is still one of the best ways to tote homework, an overloaded or improperly worn backpack will get a failing grade.

Worn correctly and not overloaded, a backpack is supported by some of the strongest muscles in the body: the back and abdominal muscles. They work together to stabilize the trunk and hold the body in proper postural alignment.