Health Topics Information

Health Topics

COVID-19 Information

COVID-19 Information

You’ve probably seen people stocking up on staples - including that elusive toilet paper - to prepare for the spread of the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). It’s even more important to stock up on trusted information about how to protect yourself and your loved ones.

COVID-19 is primarily a flu-like respiratory illness. Symptoms that are being described the most include fever, cough and shortness of breath. We’re finding that they typically occur anywhere between 2 days to 14 days after exposure. However, as the virus continues to evolve, we are also beginning to see patients that are presenting without respiratory symptoms including GI symptoms such as nausea vomiting, diarrhea and now even symptoms including abnormal taste and lack of smell.

45 is the New 50: Preventing Colon Cancer Starts Earlier

Preventing Colon Cancer Starts Earlier

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths for men and women combined. But there is good news: the number of deaths from colorectal cancer has been dropping in both men and women for several decades. One reason, researchers say, is the use of screening colonoscopies to remove colorectal polyps before they develop into cancers, or find cancers earlier when the disease is easier to treat. Another factor is that treatment for colorectal cancer has improved. In fact, there are now more than 1 million survivors of colorectal cancer in the United States.

E-Cigarettes

E-Cigarettes

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes or e-cigs) are a diverse group of products containing a heating element that produces an aerosol from a liquid via a mouthpiece. E-cigs are also known as electronic nicotine delivery devices (ENDs), vapes, vape pens, mods, tanks, and the newest term…Juul (pronounced “jewel”). Because e-cig users are inhaling a vapor and not smoke, they often refer to the act as “vaping” or “Juuling” to distinguish themselves from tobacco cigarette users.

Bundle Up and Beware of Frostbite This Winter

Bundle Up and Beware of Frostbite This Winter

This year’s Farmers’ Almanac calls for “teeth-chattering cold” across much of the nation. If you find yourself in the deep freeze, remember this: frostbite doesn’t appear frosty. The damage from this dangerous condition occurs under the skin - not at the surface. Symptoms vary and people sometimes don’t realize frostbite is occurring because their skin doesn’t feel cold. Be alert to these signs:

  • Redness, stinging, burning, throbbing or prickling sensation
  • White, bluish-white or grayish-yellow skin
  • Unusually firm or waxy skin
  • Numbness

The nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers and toes are most often affected, and damage occurs in stages.

Finding Hope for the Holiday Blues

Finding Hope for the Holiday Blues

t’s the most wonderful time of the year. Or is it? For some, holiday celebrations can increase feelings of anxiety, depression or loneliness. When you are grieving or struggling with negative emotions, the season can be very difficult. It’s full of demands on your time and energy with shopping, baking, wrapping, houseguests and parties. Winter weather with less sunlight and North Dakota weather can dampen moods. We also tend to eat and drink more, which can contribute to less-than-festive feelings.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) is celebrated throughout October and it’s an excellent opportunity to talk to victims of domestic violence about the help and services available to them, educate the public, and inspire action to end all forms of domestic violence. Domestic violence is a healthcare issue that can result in a variety of co-morbid health conditions. Those who talked to a healthcare professional about intimate partner violence were four times more likely to use an intervention. Healthcare professionals are in a unique position to help victims of domestic violence and that starts with speaking out about domestic violence, but that’s not always an easy task. Try some of these tips for having and informed conversation about domestic violence (DV).

Breast Cancer Detection Improved with 3D Mammography

Breast Cancer Detection Improved with 3D Mammography

Breast cancer is still the most common cancer for U.S. women. About one in eight women develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. Most breast cancers, approximately 85 percent occur in women who have no family history. Many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. 3D mammography, also called Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, generates multiple image slices of the breast. The radiologist can then examine the images, one slice at a time. Fine details and small tumors are more clearly visible because they are no longer hidden by overlapping tissue, which is common with traditional mammography.

September is Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month

September is Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month

Pulmonary fibrosis means scarring of the tissue of the lung. The fibrosis will continue to progress and eventually destroy the normal lung tissue making it difficult for the body to absorb oxygen into the blood. This will make the levels of oxygen low in body and cause shortness of breath and damage to other organs. More than 200 different types of pulmonary fibrosis affect one out of 200 adults over the age of 60 in the U.S., and approximately 40,000 American’s die from it each year.